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> Yesterday was a mixed bag. We had a great morning sail and on into the early afternoon everything was on track to escape the high and it's light winds. However, the afternoon showed the weather had other plans. We were once again overrun by a ridge of high pressure, the one we thought we'd managed to outpace. The wind died entirely and we parked up under the bright sun and glassy water. We tried in vain to keep Dawn Star moving but it was not to be. Pilot whales and dolphin seemed to be similarly affected as they lolled about the surface, swimming about aimlessly about in apparent sympathy with our plight. It seems hard to believe there was a time when we took eight knots of boat speed for granted. At this point, we'd be willing to pay a King's ransom for just eight knots of wind.
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> Eventually, after sunset, the wind returned; light and variable, but enough to work with. We slowly made our way into the night. The fog rolled in again, like a wet blanket thrown over everything. We're now quite used to it and the tiny universe it creates around Dawn Star.
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> Sailing in these conditions is quite challenging as the helmsman has no point of reference but the compass and one must focus hard to keep the boat going straight. After a while it's quite easy to get confused and steer the wrong way, causing the little boat speed we have worked so hard to build up to bleed off. To prevent this we used a half hour rotation, where everyone switched jobs before they went snow blind staring into the gray mist. The crew on deck stayed cheerful telling jokes and poking fun at the rest of the world, which we're sure is still out there even though there's no way to sense any of it from our little space bubble on the ocean.
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> Morning came with a little wind and we're tracking northward, still looking to catch real wind at the top of the high we've been forever escaping since the start. Hopefully today we'll be successful.
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