NEWPORT, R.I. — After a hard-earned third-place finish in IRC Class 3 in the 2015 Transatlantic Race, the Prospector team is back with a new boat, many of the same crew and an itch to better their performance from four years ago.

2017 AR Prospector DF webThe Transatlantic Race 2019, scheduled to start Tuesday, June 25, off Newport, R.I., is organized jointly by the Royal Yacht Squadron, New York Yacht Club, Royal Ocean Racing Club and Storm Trysail Club. The race is a direct descendant of the first great transatlantic ocean race, which started from New York Harbor on December 11, 1866. The 2019 edition will be the 31st transatlantic race organized by the New York Yacht Club, and it remains one of the sport’s most enticing challenges. The race will start off Castle Hill Lighthouse in Newport on Tuesday, June 25.

The Prospector team—led by Paul McDowell, Dr. David Siwicki and Larry Landry (left to right in photo at left), and Marty Roesch (not pictured) and managed by Landry and McDowell—is one of five returning entries from the Transatlantic Race 2015. Landry, McDowell and Siwicki, along with three others, entered the 2015 race as a challenge to themselves. They’d been racing with and against each other for many years and were eager to add the transatlantic passage to their collective sailing passport.

For Joe Mele, a 55-year-old retired doctor of internal medicine in New York City and fantastical stunt diver, ocean racing is about more than the competition.

“I love the fact that it’s not just a race, but sort of an adventure,” said Mele, a gregarious skipper with a strong affinity for offshore racing. “It takes a tremendous amount of coordination to build the crew and manage the logistics. You’re out there for an extended period of time, and there’s tremendous camaraderie when you’re lucky enough to put together a good crew where you feed off each other and improve.”

TL C50 Sydney TrainingMele’s program focuses almost exclusively on point-to-point racing aboard his Cookson 50 Triple Lindy (above). He’s logged more than 8,700 nautical miles offshore since 2003, and next summer he plans to add another 3,000 to his resume by participating in the granddaddy of them all, the Transatlantic Race 2019.

comet trophy sStart Antigua: May 8, 2019

Hamilton, Bermuda: October 23, 2018: The Royal Bermuda Yacht Club announces that the third edition of the Antigua Bermuda Race will start on the May 8, 2019 and will be part of the 2019 Atlantic Ocean Racing Series (AORS).

The 2019 Atlantic Ocean Racing Series will consist of five races: RORC Caribbean 600, Antigua Bermuda Race, Transatlantic Race 2019, Rolex Fastnet Race, and Rolex Middle Sea Race. Three races, including the Transatlantic Race (weighted 1.5) will be required to qualify.

"The TR 2019 committee unanimously thinks adding the Antigua Bermuda Race to the AORS is a splendid idea and should benefit all the races included. We are very excited about the enhancement to the series," commented Co-chair Patti Young.

NEWPORT, R.I. — With the deadline for early entries—and a savings of $1,000 off the entry fee—approaching, the confirmed fleet for the Transatlantic Race 2019 includes a diverse group of 15 yachts from 42 to 78 feet in length. A handful of the entries for 2019 completed the 2015 race, including Constantin Claviez' Swan 441 Charisma (above), which hails from Hamburg, Germany.

"We're very encouraged by the early interest in the Transatlantic Race 2019," says event chair Patricia Young (Jamestown, R.I.), who competed in the 2011 edition of the race. "This is no small undertaking; successfully completing a transatlantic race is a pretty large feather in the cap of any sailor. The previous edition of the race, in 2015, produced some thrilling moments, including a 24-hour monohull record, and left every competitor with memories that will last a lifetime. We're expecting more of the same next summer."

The Transatlantic Race 2019 starts from Newport, R.I., on June 25, 2019, and finishes off Cowes, England. The course length of 2,960 nautical miles makes this event one of the longest yacht races open to both professional and amateur sailors. It will be the 31st transatlantic race organized, at least in part, by the New York Yacht Club. The Transatlantic Race 2019 is organized by the Royal Yacht Squadron, the New York Yacht Club, the Royal Ocean Racing Club and the Storm Trysail Club. The deadline for the early entry discount is Saturday, September 1.

A new addition to the 2019 race will be a doublehanded division. In 2015, a few entries in the 40-foot Class 40 division raced with just two sailors on board. But they were scored among all the other entries.

"We've had significant interest from sailors who would like to compete doublehanded," says Young. "We're more than pleased to acknowledge their persistence, endurance and teamwork with their own division and trophies."

An additional incentive for skippers considering the Transatlantic Race 2019 is that all entrants will also be guaranteed a spot in the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race, which starts from Cowes on Sunday, August 18, 2019. This race has become one of the most popular distance events in the world, with the entry list filling up within minutes of entries opening.

Photo credits: © Daniel Forster/NYYC

2017 AR Prospector DF web

NEWPORT, R.I. — Faster boats and advanced weather forecasting technology have dramatically changed how sailors approach long ocean races such as the Transatlantic Race 2019, which will start from Newport, R.I., on Tuesday, June 25, 2019, and finish off the Royal Yacht Squadron's iconic castle in Cowes, England.

A century ago, ocean racing was a reactive sport, sailors took what Mother Nature dished out as it came. Now, bigger and faster boats enable teams to attack a course, aggressively searching for the strongest and most favorable winds. Of course, it’s not without risk.

In the Transatlantic Race 2015, the Prospector team found itself on the leading edge of a powerful weather system for much of the 3,000-mile passage from Newport, R.I., to England.

“We always had good pressure and knew when we needed more it was just off to our left,” says Paul McDowell, one of a consortium of owners based out of Eastern Long Island’s Shelter Island Yacht Club. “Playing with that weather system, which we took to calling ‘poking the bear,’ was tricky though. For one 36-hour period we got a little too close and ended up sailing in some really difficult conditions; 40- to 50-knot winds with huge breaking seas. In those 36 hours, we learned a lot about the boat, our crew and what not to do next time. We all look back on that now with mixed degrees of fondness and relief to have survived it.”

For ocean racers, the relief peaks when crossing the finish line, but the fondness grows slowly and eventually becomes the predominant emotion. Which explains why the Prospector team, with more than two years to reflect on that race, was among the first boats to officially sign-up for the Transatlantic Race 2019 and continue a tradition that dates back to the first transatlantic sailing competition, which started from New York Harbor on Christmas Day 1866.

The Transatlantic Race 2019 will be the 31st race between Europe and the United States organized, at least partially, by the New York Yacht Club. The Transatlantic Race 2019 is organized by the Royal Yacht Squadron, the New York Yacht Club, the Royal Ocean Racing Club and the Storm Trysail Club.

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